That little bang is enough to penetrate the scalp and destroy the contents” says a well-groomed man on a TED-like stage in front of many people. As he mentions this, a sudden grasp of terror and surprise is raised from the audience. He is neither advocating for gun control or showing off a new automatic rifle. He’s pointing at a small drone which just ran towards a mannequin’s head creating a sudden noise

That little bang is enough to penetrate the scalp and destroy the contents” says a well-groomed man on a TED-like stage in front of many people. As he mentions this, a sudden grasp of terror and surprise is raised from the audience. He is neither advocating for gun control or showing off a new automatic rifle. He’s pointing at a small drone which just ran towards a mannequin’s head creating a sudden noise

This killer robot was part of a fake video, but it soon gathered more than 1.5 million views. It was an effort by computer scientists to warn about the risks of having autonomous weapons operating without human control

Even if this is a dramatization of the issue, it’s understandable that you might get worried about a similar scenario happening any time soon. Sci-fi cinematography and literature have created in us fear of a world with more technologically-advanced and human-like machines.

Despite the not so great premises, the goal of this article is to try to address some of the most common myths and misconceptions about drones, especially those called “Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)” or “industrial drones”. Industrial drones differ from commercial ones because of their bigger dimensions and for their use in a broader plethora of sectors, from the military to agriculture, city management, rescue, and many more.

So, without further ado, let’s go directly to the core of the issue:

  1. Industrial drones are dangerous, are they?
    As for all new technologies, what kills or harms other humans are not the machines themselves, but those who programmed them to do so. Industrial drones can be extremely helpful in performing a long list of tasks, even better and more safely than we as humans could do. Imagine the case of an earthquake. People trapped under tons of heavy debris. In 2017 China launched a new program using drones to find and rescue people after earthquakes. In the same year, a Chinese high-tech industrial drones manufacturer, called Shenzhen JTT Technology, was saving Australians’ lives by guarding the coasts and protecting them from sharks and other dangers. In November 2017, the same company showcased its anti-terror drone solutions at Milipol Paris 2017, the world’s largest global security event.

  1. Industrial drones are difficult to control, are they?
    After the launch of the first Macintosh in 1980, the world changed its idea of computers from difficult-to-use to more user-friendly machines. It was considered a big event, but we can perceive the changes even more vividly now by comparing this old machine to a new MacBook Pro. A similar process is shaping the drone industry, even for industrial drones. The same company we just mentioned, Shenzhen JTT Technology, launched in May 2018 a new product called “JTT Spider C85”. Its “simple mode” provides high security and enjoyable rides even to the most inexperienced drone beginners. Anyways, practice makes perfect.

  2. Industrial drones are heavy and cumbersome, are they?
    Due to the big dimensions of most UAVs, this point is between fact and myth. It is true that industrial drones are on average more cumbersome than other light commercial models. But industrial drones can be programmed to carry a heavy load. It has been predicted that in the future this type of technology will substitute or support human labor in constructions sites. Besides, Dubai has already started testing a drone taxi service. On the other hand, carrying an industrial drone around doesn’t necessarily have to be a literal pain in the neck. The Spider C85 can be folded in 30 seconds and is so portable that can be placed inside a backpack.

  1. Industrial drones are not that useful, aren’t they?
    A lot of people asked to describe today’s UAV will usually be thinking about multi rotors buzzing on private property to invade our privacy. Another common image is that of military versions carrying ammunition or weapons, hence causing harm and death in war zones, especially in the Middle East. For instance, UAVs are already being used in the agricultural fields to supply farmers with valuable data on where and when to water their crops. Some of them are capable of distinguishing healthy plants from sick ones. They can also assist in irrigating fields, and that’s the case of the JTT A15. As for the belief of UAVs as killing machines, this is another misrepresentation of the current situation. Only a few of UAVs in today’s military are used to carry ammunition. Most of them provide soldiers with real-time intelligent surveillance.

  2. Industrial drones are just toys, are they?
    On the other spectrum of who sees UAVs as spies or killing machines are those who see drones as just toys. They are actually still aircrafts, even if perfectly foldable and easy to operate. So even though they look small and harmless, they can still create big damages in the wrong hands. Flying them is so much fun, but attention and carefulness are always advised. Industrial drone manufacturers are investing in R&D and product development to ensure a safer control over your unmanned vehicle.

No matter what side you’re on, arguments for and against the use of UAVs are all over the place. What is true is that these products are not the mindless terminator machines that the media is trying to portrait. They can provide unprecedented help to us humans in various tasks. In the end, we will have to accept that they have become parts of our lives and this trend is very unlikely to stop any time soon. So instead of demonizing them, let’s focus on the positive impact and value of an industry which is expected to have a compound annual growth rate of 51% within 2021.

Shenzhen JTT Technology has a very meticulous R&D process with more than 10000 tests and takes the security of its drones very seriously. To them and to prosperity we will commit the future of these often misunderstood and yet so helpful machines.